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Custom Tool Insert Professional: Anne Cooper – Master of Design

Anne Cooper

Meet Anne Cooper, a 27-year veteran of the custom cutting tools industry. Anne is the Lead Design Engineer for GWS Tool Groups’ insert division and started her career with humble origins as a machine operator in the Edge Prep Department. From there, she has continued to perfect her craft and expand her responsibilities, making her position one of the company’s most vital roles.

Uniquely enough, Anne’s path to becoming an integral part of the GWS family started as she was celebrating her 25-year anniversary in the industry. It happened to be the same day it was announced that CGI Tool would be joining the GWS Tool Group Family.

A Design Dynamo

Using solid model CAD/CAM software and years worth of experience, Anne designs custom cutting tool inserts that machine parts as diverse as medical implants to parts for heavy machinery. It is not uncommon for customers and sales representatives to ask Anne to work from basic 2D part prints or reverse engineer a sample to design custom inserts to fit their special needs

In addition to her design work, on a typical day you can find Anne taking an active role in researching & developing new techniques “to improve the features of an insert for a customer’s unique application, while working to keep costs down at the same time.”

Mindful Mechanics

While Anne is modest about her natural abilities, she has a strong mathematical and mechanical background, citing the fact that “her father was a self-taught inventor and her grandfather was an architect.” Combined with degrees in Manufacturing Technology and Design Technology, she uses her strong background to help “visualize the whole process and imagine the proper tool” for the customer’s requirements.

Anne Cooper

The GWS “Edge”

As an expert in her field, Anne takes pride in knowing that GWS never hesitates to invest in new technology that will make a better product for their customers. “Working with the most advanced equipment on the market helps us provide a much faster turnaround than the competition,” she said. “Plus, it’s a lot of fun having new toys to play with.”

Beyond Design

Thanks to her diverse background, Anne is very knowledgeable in all aspects of the business and truly knows it inside and out. She enjoys the different challenges that every day brings and has the confidence that her years of experience, along with utilization of state-of-the-art machinery, will enable her to handle any task.

Beside custom cutting tools, she has a strong knowledge of CNC machines and is a tremendous asset when it comes to troubleshooting and fixing a downed machine to prevent costly downtime and expensive service calls.

Off the Clock

Anne Cooper

In her free time, Anne enjoys spending time with her kids and contributing to the community. She is vice president of the local chapter of Optimist International, a worldwide volunteer organization whose members work each day to make the future brighter by bringing out the best in children and their communities. Anne’s group helps to promote childhood health & wellness, organizes programs for summer youth camps and offers scholarship opportunities to assist local high school students.

 

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How GWS Cutting Tools Go from Custom to Standard

Many of the tailor-made cutting tools we engineer for customers are so innovative they are easily adaptable to a wider range of applications than originally anticipated. This doesn’t happen by accident. Our organization is full of highly experienced and talented people who have a knack for both listening to customer feedback and seeing the future potential for each tool they design. Because of this, every custom project we undertake has the potential to develop a new standard tool for our catalog, expanding and strengthening our overall product mix.

Tool Design 101

How does a custom tool become a standard? It’s not rocket science (actually, sometimes it is), but a careful thought process consisting of equal parts of experience, knowledge and communication.

custom cutting tool

For example, here’s a quick overview of the design process for an end mill. The first step is to marry the tool to the cutting material. There is still a lot of machining in nonferrous aluminum material, especially in the aerospace/aircraft sector. Machine tool builders are busy making machines for that area, which are usually outfitted with high rpm spindles (30k rpm and up) and can feed as fast as 1,000 IPM. It’s up to us to develop the right kind of cutting tool that works in these high-volume removal applications.

This involves calculating the chip load based on the tool diameter to get good chip thickness and generate the proper cutting angle to attain the preferred shearing action.

Communication with the end user during the development process is vital to improve the original design. We stand right by the machine, listen to the customer’s feedback and fine-tune the geometries of the tool until its performance and longevity match our high expectations.

When we have success with a particular design in a certain application, we document it in our master database. The library acts as a starting point when the next request arrives for a similar material and application. Having examples to work from puts us ahead of the game and speeds up delivery times for a new tool.

Rapid Prototyping

This is truly where GWS stands apart from the competition. We do not impose limits on ourselves simply because we already have an outstanding standard product portfolio. If a custom tool is required, we pride ourselves on delivering the very best design without prolonged wait times for the end customer.

A critical component of our “custom comes standard” model is our ability to pull resources, develop completely new tooling (be it custom inserts, a complex form tool or redesigned high-performance end mill) and deliver it to the customer in days. With other suppliers, the wait could be weeks or even months. Our capacity also allows us to deliver these tools with scale (a few hundred to a few thousand pieces), to support the largest of demands.

Constant Learning. Practical Applications.

The entire process is actually a little more sophisticated than our simple outline would suggest. Tooling design has gone beyond the typical 4 flute design that used to be the benchmark. Variations today include indexable tooling options, variable helix from flute to flute that eliminate vibration and chatter, eccentric reliefs ground in for better edge support, and edge preparation for better tool life.

The evolution of the best tool is always a moving target. Developments are always on the horizon, from manufacturing and inspection technologies to new carbide substrate compositions and advances in the area of PVD and CVD coatings. To keep pace, our own education process needs to be continuous.

Even understanding the varieties of software customers are using in their process is a must in developing the right cutting tool. A tool for light, high speed Z-level machining will be designed very differently from one for heavy, high-volume milling applications. Understanding the capabilities of a customer’s software enables us to not only design the right tool, but also helps our programmers determine if applying a more efficient toolpath for the customer is possible.

Whether you use a model right out of our catalog or need a custom approach, contact us for a consultation. Either way, we’ll always deliver the cutting tool you need.